The days are getting longer, there’s beers chilling in the icebox and prawns are sizzling on the barbecue. What more could you want? How about 10% OFF selected summer adventures? That’s 10% OFF hiking through Tasmanian forests, sipping wine along the Margaret River, snorkeling at Ningaloo Reef and falling asleep under Outback stars. And frankly, it couldn’t come at a better time. Summer means catching Australia at her dazzling best. So get out there and make this the greatest summer ever!  Discount will automatically be applied to applicable toursFull terms & conditions

Trip Name Days From AUD
Southern Ocean Wildlife Adventure (Original)

3

$607

Perth to Adelaide Overland

9

$1,390

Kangaroo Island and the Great Ocean Road Adventure (Basix)

4

$760

Melbourne to Melbourne Adventure Loop (Basix)

3

$405

Melbourne to Melbourne Adventure Loop (Original)

3

$612

Perth to Broome Overland

10

$1,615

Great Ocean Road Adventure ex Melbourne (Original)

3

$472

Kangaroo Island Adventure (Original)

2

$422

Taste of Tasmania (Original)

6

$1,120

Kangaroo Island Adventure (Basix)

2

$400

Rock the Centre

3

$399

Taste of Tasmania (Basix)

6

$805

Rock the Centre (ex Yulara)

3

$399

The Great Ocean Road and Kangaroo Island Adventure (Original)

5

$1,075

The Great Ocean Road and Kangaroo Island Adventure (Basix)

5

$859

Adelaide to Perth Overland

10

$1,480

Great Ocean Road Adventure ex Adelaide (Original)

2

$328

Great Ocean Road Adventure ex Melbourne (Basix)

3

$382

Esperance and Southwest Adventure

6

$783

Great Ocean Road Adventure ex Adelaide (Basix)

2

$283

Southern Ocean Wildlife Adventure

3

$445

Eyre Peninsula Overland

6

$752

Hike in the Grampians National Park

Take a deep breath and savour the fresh mountain air. The ruggedly beautiful Grampians National Park, which is comprised of four separate mountain ranges, is the perfect summer playground. All told there’s more than 150 kilometres of walking tracks to be explored, with a mix of trails ranging from leisurely strolls to overnight camping treks. The paths cross through some of Victoria’s best scenery, taking hikers past blooming wildflowers, panoramic vistas, and the cascading terraces of Mackenzie Falls. Want to beat the heat? Dive into the wealth of water sports on offer. Glide along in a kayak, take up water skiing, or put your sailing skills to the test.

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Hit the surf along the Great Ocean Road

Is it any surprise that an island nation with nearly 26,000 kilometres of coastline is famous for its surfing? Bells Beach along Victoria’s winding Great Ocean Road boasts an international reputation as one of the country’s best surf spots. If you don’t know what ‘fakie’ or  ‘barney’ mean, drop into nearby Torquay for a surf lesson. If you’d rather swim than ride the wives, Bells is a bit rough, but there are plenty of other beaches along the coast to choose from. Lorne, Apollo Bay and Anglesea are all great options. 

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Get dusty in The Red Centre

The Outback’s endless ochre deserts have captured the Australian imagination for centuries. Here you’ll find otherworldly rock formations and rough-hewn gorges so spectacular they’ve inspired the country’s most enduring legends  – from Aboriginal Dreamtime stories down to the monstrous Bunyip. In January the thermostat can soar to 38 degrees, but travel into the country’s rusty red heart and you’ll be well-rewarded. Stand in awe before Uluru, get lost in the folds of Kata Tjuta, and stop for a dip in the (croc-free) waterholes of the West Macdonnell Ranges. At the end of the day, roll out your swag and camp out beneath the glow of a thousand twinkling stars.  

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Swim with sea lions in Baird Bay

Drive up the western coast of the Eyre Peninsula and you’ll discover the remote coastal village of Baird Bay. You’ll also find one of the few places where you can swim with totally wild sea lions and bottlenose dolphins. That’s right. No cages. No glass walls. Just unbridled freedom in the open ocean. The locals have formed a close relationship with their aquatic friends over many years. Curious sea lions will even swim right up to the boat just to say hello. You can jump right in and play with these amazing animals while learning more about how they live off Australia’s southern coast.

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Take shade in Tasmania’s Tarkine Forest

The pristine forests of Australia’s ‘apple isle’ are legendary – and for good reason. Tasmania’s Tarkine Forest Reserve is a sprawling 1,800-square kilometre patch of uninterrupted wilderness, marked with rivers, hidden caves and hundreds of animal species. Walking beneath the reserve’s giant tree ferns, don’t be surprised if a wombat bumbles across your path, or if you hear the telltale signs of a glider leaping from tree to tree overhead. The Tarkine is also home to some of Australia’s most important Aboriginal heritage, with rock carvings dating back over 40,000 years!

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Meet sunbaking kangaroos at Cape Le Grand National Park

At first blush you might feel that you need to check your map again. With brilliant blue waters, white powder beaches and nearly 110 islands sprinkled along the coast, it’s easy to think you’ve taken a wrong turn and ended up in the Whitsundays. Cape Le Grand National Park is a more remote, yet equally beautiful, nature reserve in Western Australia that boasts a diversity of flora and fauna and some of the country’s best beaches. Explore the park’s wild reaches on a hike to Frenchman Peak, relax on the beach with some sunbathing grey kangaroos, or listen to the wind at Thistle Cove’s ‘whistling rock’.

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Sip wine at Margaret River

Laid out from end to end, the Margaret River region is 110 kilometres of sheer indulgence.  Premium restaurants, microbreweries and world-class wineries vie for your attention alongside tranquil waterways and karri forests. If you’re looking for long evenings spent with a bottle of wine and good company, or perhaps an extra serve of deliciously creamy cheese, then this is the place to be. With more than 120 wineries to choose from, the only difficult part is deciding where to begin.

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Look for Nemo at Ningaloo Reef

If Nemo, Marlin and Dory had a vacation home, this would be it. While The Great Barrier Reef may hold the title of Australia’s largest coral reef, Ningaloo is the world’s largest fringing reef. Confused? That means it’s the only place on Earth where you can access a huge diversity of coral and marine life simply by swimming off the beach! Wade out a few metres from the shore and then dive into a world of dolphins, manta rays, dugongs, and (if you’re lucky) even a huge whale shark.

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Go wild on Kangaroo Island

A short ferry ride from the mainland you’ll find Kangaroo Island, one of Australia’s most underrated wildlife sanctuaries. Mostly rural and substantially underdeveloped, the limited encroachment of human activity has allowed local wildlife to thrive. Over a third of the island is a protected nature reserve, which is home to a plethora of penguin colonies, koalas and kangaroos. If you’re looking for thrills, you can hire a sand board and take a ride down Little Sahara’s smooth sand dunes, or grab a kayak and explore the tranquil estuaries of the Harriet River.

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Relax with a sundowner in Sydney

After camping out at Uluru, swimming with wildlife off the West Coast and wandering the Tarkine, you’ll be ready to swap wilderness for cosmopolitan streets and trendy bars. Welcome to Sydney. Crammed with chic boutiques, hipster cafes and its fair share of convict history, the unofficial capital of Australia is a haven for foodies and socialites. Bliss out beachside on Bondi, see masterpieces at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, or drop by Paddington Market for a browse. At sunset, grab an ice-cold beer at one of the city’s rooftop bars and enjoy stunning views of a certain well-known Harbour Bridge.

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